Pixel Vertax D12 Grip for Nikon D800/E Review

A long-standing sign of expert SLRs is two places of manages straight and horizontally. Vertical manages make the cameras simpler to deal with when capturing in the image structure, and the larger hold also helps managing with lengthy, large contact contacts. Many battery power holds also come with another – a rise in highest possible framerate. The Nikon D300S, for example, can capture at a highest possible rate of 6fps ‘out of the box’ but with Nikon’s MB-D10 battery power hold, the extra power increases it to 8fps. Based upon on the kind of of photography that you do, this might be an important rate improve.

Grip for Nikon D800/E
Grip for Nikon D800/E

The Nikon D800 and D800E are restricted to 4fps in full-resolution FX structure, but Nikon’s MB-D12 hold does allow them to accomplish 6fps in DX method (using AA battery power or the EN-EL18 battery power from the D4, which needs optionally available BL-5 Battery Area Cover) as well as offering those useful straight manages. The bad information is that based on where you buy it, the MB-D12 will surely price you between $450-616, and that’s not such as the expense of an extra EN-EL15 battery power, the BL-5 Battery Area Protect to assistance the EN-EL18, or 8X AAs.

The great information if you’re a D800 proprietor, is that the MB-D12 isn’t your only choice. The Vertax D12, from Hong Kong-based Pixel Businesses copies almost all of the performance of the Nikon MB-D12 battery power hold for the Nikon D800/E, and also copies the straight manages. In comparison to the MB-D12 though, its significant promoting feature (literally) is a significantly discounted of around $99.

Grip for Nikon D800E
The Vertax grip replicates all of the controls of Nikon’s MB-D12, including front and rear control dials, a shutter button, AF-on button and rear joystick.
Grip for Nikon D800E
The Vertax D12 attaches to the D800 via its tripod mount. In this view you can see the deeply contoured vertical grip, and the shutter button, which has a locking collar to prevent accidental operation.

So what does your $99 buy you? Well, it purchases you a near replicated of Nikon’s MB-D12, with the same energy choices (a plate for having an extra EN-EL15 battery energy, and another for 8x AA tissues, and a little velveteen pocket to keep whatever you’re not using) and the same straight manages, such as an ‘AF-On’ key and back joystick. Pixel is uncertain about the development content, but while very well put-together it is evident from near examination that the Vertax is constructed from thermoplastic rather than the more costly mixture of plastic content and magnesium-alloy that Nikon utilizes in the MB-D12. A smaller USB slot can be found under the ‘Pixel’ blanking dish on the top of check your hold, presumably for firmware up-dates to keep interface if necessary in the long run (at time of composing, no firmware is available for the Vertax D12 grip).

Grip for Nikon D800E
The Vertax D12 comes with two battery trays (the compartment door is integral) which allow you to fit a second EN-EL15 (in addition to one in the camera) or 8x AA batteries into the grip. The D800 will work perfectly well without any batteries in the grip, but you won’t get that extra frame per second in DX mode.

Despite the less expensive components, the Vertax is very well designed. Battery power containers secure safely in place with no ‘wobble’, and all of the joints are awesome and limited with no bend. Almost all of the hold is protected in dense rubberized, just like the MB-D12, and the back and front control tires are also rubberised, and move with company detents. The AF-on and shutter control buttons don’t have quite the same positive travel as the comparative manages on the D800’s body, but they don’t experience dry or ‘clicky’. The minor improvement in the experience of these manages is probably due, at least in part, to a deficiency of weather-sealing. The Nikon MB-D12 is completely weather-sealed, but the Vertax provides an imperfect protect against the sun and rain. A rubberized closure defends the electric connections that hook you up to the hold, and the multi-controller seems to be to have a rubberized sleeve, too, but as far as I can set up, the battery section entrance is entirely unsecured.

Grip for Nikon D800E
Although the body material of the Vertax D12 is polycarbonate, as opposed to magnesium alloy for the body of the D800 (and Nikon’s MB-D12 grip) it is nicely solid and screws tightly to the base of the camera.

Summing Up

Overall, the Vertax D12 is great value. For the price (which has a 2-year assurance from Pixel), I have no serious problems, but it isn’t a finish no-brainer. There are explanations why Pixel is asking for so much less than Nikon. Those ready to invest the additional for Nikon’s MB-D12 will be compensated with a little bit better construction, the choice to use the D4’s EN-EL18 battery power (via the $30 BL-5 Battery Area Cover) complete climate closing, and a mineral magnesium metal invest that seems more like extra time of you. The Vertax D12’s thermoplastic invest is and well-built, but still seems rather a little like an ‘add on’, at the same time a very strong one. Also, there’s more than one way to think about price. As with all third-party components, in the unlikely occasion of the Vertax D12 destructive you you must not anticipate much concern from Nikon.

What we like: Solid and well made, straight manages aid managing in image structure and additional hold creates using long large contacts more relaxed. Extra structure per second in DX structure (using AA batteries), very great value in comparison to Nikon’s MB-D12. What we don’t like: Nasty body does not experience quite as important to the D800 as mag-alloy, control buttons not quite as awesome as D800/MB-D12, no choice to use the D4’s EN-EL18 battery power, imperfect weather-sealing.